Archive for the ‘Nigeria’ Category

Some Highlights of Nigerian Labor Law Act Cap 198 Relevant for Small Business Owners

April 28, 2017

 

  1. Employees must be paid in cash
  2. Payment by check can only be made with the prior consent of the employee
  3. Employer cannot impose conditions on how or where an employee spends his wages
  4. Any advance on salary cannot exceed one month salary and minimum recovery time is 3 months
  5. If there is an outstanding advance employer cannot make a new advance except in necessity
  6. Employers can only make deductions in respect of fines for willful misconduct or neglect if employee has been previously notified and agreed in his contract
  7. Pension scheme deductions must be consented to by employee
  8. Overpayment deductions can only be made if discovered within 3 months
  9. Total deductions from employees salary cannot exceed 1/3 of monthly salary
  10. Contracts required to be signed within 3 months of employment
  11. Any change in terms of contract must be communicated within one month to the employee
  12. Employment contracts terminate on death of employee, expiry of notice or expiry of fixed term contract
  13. Statutory requirements for notice
    1. 1 day if less than 3 months
    2. 1 week if more than 3 months but less than 2 years
    3. 2 weeks if more than 2 years but less than 5 years
    4. 1 months if more than 5 years of continuous service
  14. Conduct that would enable employer terminate contract without notice

a. Gross misconduct such as fraud, theft, insubordination or criminal neglect

  1. Either party can waive the right to notice or to accepting payment in lieu of notice
  2. All wages are to be paid before expiry of notice
  3. Employer not liable to pay for days employee absent
  4. Payment in lieu of notice only applies to salary not overtime or allowances
  5. Normal working hours are fixed through mutual agreement
  6. Work in excess of working hours constitutes over time
  7. If employee is to work more than 6 continuous hours he/she is entitled to 1 hour aggregate break/rest interval
  8. Worker entitled to one day of rest in 7 days
  9. Workers entitled to up to 12 days of paid sick leave for temporary illness if certified by a registered doctor nominated by the employer
  10. After 12 months of continuous service employee is entitled to 6 working days of paid leave
  11. Sick leave and annual leave pay only includes salary (not overtime or allowances)
  12. Women are entitled to 6 weeks leave before birth and confinement and 6 weeks of leave after birth and confinement at 50% of salary
  13. Employer not liable for healthcare costs of said woman
  14. If you have more than 25 employees you are required to set up a pension scheme (Pension Act Cap 346)
  15. Employees in hazardous occupations (mining, heavy machinery etc) must be insured against injury (Workmen’s Compensation Act Cap 407)

Armed Forces Remembrance Day: We Need To Talk About Biafra

January 16, 2017

It was Armed Forces Remembrance Day in Nigeria yesterday. Our big brass and the politricksions went and laid wreaths for unknown soldiers. Wouldn’t it have been nice if they had speedily passed legislation for the payment of veterans entitlements instead of creating entitlements of themselves instead?

Let’s look at this Armed Forces Remembrance Day anyway. It started out as a commemoration of the soldiers that fought in the First World War in which Nigerian and African soldiers fought and died with the rest of the global community. Whether they went voluntarily or not is irrelevant if you ask me. They represented.

Then Obasanjo, that wily fox, went and changed it to commemorate the ‘surrender of Biafra troops’ effectively ensuring that the end of Civil War itself is not specifically commemorated or the events discussed. And discussions about the civil was and Biafra are drowned out in a natural outpouring of communal patriotism and and nationalism. To speak about the Civil War and Biafra on such a day would seem sacrilegious as Femi Kani Kayode no doubt learnt.

Of keen interest to me is the change in the tone of the media. Since the administration of Obansanjo the military has mostly been under fire from the media for their human rights violations. Amnesty International kept up a relentless stream of reports and Nigeria was unable to buy arms under some United States act that they invoke on a need to basis.

Now we are talking about the sacrifices that the soldiers are making and there is absolutely no single credible media report about the situation in the militarised zones of the north east, south south and south east. Has our military reformed over night as if by magic? But I thought Buhari keeps them busy chasing cattle rustlers and training in animal farming techniques in Argentina. It is a public relations victory?

I suggest to activists in the Niger Delta to consider the use of drones to capture footage. The activists at Standing Rock, the Native American protest against encroachment on tribal lands used drones to record footage that showed the real picture to the world. Watch the video. The drone pilot said he is completely self taught by the way.

Why do we need to talk about Biafra and why do our rulers want us to forget it? Because we need to heal the physic wounds that continue to haunt nation building in Nigeria. And to heal those wounds we need to listen to each other and accommodate each others points of view – and then find common ground to agree on. Instead what happens is every time the topic is raised there is a still a winner and vanquished mentality – the one saying “You tried to exterminate us, we do not feel safe” and the other saying “You lost the war, deal with it.” Even Chinua Achebe’s account was vilified and divided the national debate. Neither is productive.

The patriarchal old men that have been making decisions about Nigeria’s future learnt well the lessons of the jungle. Control information, only write down stuff in an elaborate code, control access to the code and who can read it. The masses will forget.

The old were revered as living encyclopaedia’s. Imagine what it must have been like when life expectancy was even lower and even fewer made it to old age. All that remains in the common memory is the idea of an injustice inflicted once upon a time, brought out and dusted off by old men (and young) when they need to whip up the crowd.

In the era of new media its tricky to pull off a scam like that. And video IS the new frontier for credible news delivered via the world wide web. It becomes both a record and an account and dilutes the influence and power of those wily old men that would keep their subjects ignorant and malleable. It would be great to see some female leadership too.

 

While, it is appropriate to remember and support our troops, those gone and those risking their lives, media coverage needs to be balanced and consistent to keep the government institutions on their toes and to keep citizens informed. We need to ask questions and investigate their allegations. And we need to whole heartedly celebrate the end of the Civil War and stop making it about the ‘defeat’ of Biafra and sweeping it under the carpet.

The men of the Nigerian Army sure do need our support right now. They’re spread pretty thin – north east,north central, south south, south east, cattle rearing, oil & gas security, Liberia and about to go off to Gambia. And they face formidable foes. Lets keep praying my praying brethren that trouble doesn’t erupt in the north west and south west.

Sadly, stories coming from the front lines seem to suggest they maybe as inadequately cared for as ever. Even in the military Nigerian women  are left to pick up the slack.

 

 

 

 

Are You Required to Produce Husband’s Consent For Passports?

January 7, 2017

The Federal High Court sitting in Port Harcourt decided you did not when they gave this judgement in 2009 in Dr. Priye Iyalla_Amadi vs The Director General of the Nigeria Immigration Service.

I think the NIS said they appealed the matter. I wonder where they are on it so far. Can’t find anything about the status. Whats the composition of the appeals court and the supreme court? Just thinking out loud.

The defendants did not really dispute the facts adduced by the plaintiff in their counter_affidavit but sought to justify the requirement of a letter of consent from the husband of a married woman who wants to be issued a Nigerian passport on the basis that Nigerian married women are classified alongside with minors by the government as persons who require consent from the head of the family. NIS argued that the requirement for consent was put in place to perpetuate the authority of the man over his wife, no matter the status she had attained in society. It also stated that the requirement was set to avoid unnecessary breakdown of marriage institution in the country.

Its important to pursue legal precedents expanding women’s rights all  the way to the Supreme Court. And those cases should attract support from women, women’s groups and women’s funds.  If you have any current information about this case could you drop an update for me? Or steer me towards someone who knows? I’d appreciate it.

 

 

Happy Independence Day Nigeria! 

October 1, 2016

 

I like this #HeroesandHelmets initiative. Its a feel good initiative. And we need some feel-good on this day that is the 56th year of our Independence from the white man in Nigeria.

Perhaps we have lost the real meaning of Independence. I have read curses on Nigeria, blessings, wishful thinking, deceit, lies and plain old grand standing.

“There is nothing to celebrate. We are hungry. We are angry. We are poor. We are BAD.”

We have forgotten the real meaning of our Independence. We have forgotten that what we celebrate is not the creation of a nation called Nigeria. (Techinically that was created in 1914.) We celebrate the formal end of colonial administration over the indigenous (black) peoples of Nigeria.

if you think that’s not something to celebrate think for a minute about the many black brethren gunned down like common criminals by the police in the United States of American – that flickering beacon of freedom and democracy. Black people gunned down doing things you take for granted here in Nigeria – selling bootleg DVDs, driving without a taillight, taking a corner without signalling, having a psychotic incident in the market place, walking down the street after dark.

In 2016, today on our 56th Independence Anniversary more than on any other day before I am soooooo happy that our forebears triumphed in their fight for freedom. Today more than any other day I am happy that my sons grew up free men in a free (albeit imperfect) nation. They’re not yet safe from institutional bullying but that is the fight if the NEW GENERATION.

We build a wall brick by brick and it is not any one person’s portion to build it all. We build on what’s come before.

Put this day in the context of slavery, colonialism and Jim Crow and then tell me again there is nothing to celebrate. Fifty-six years since Independence. ONLY. Less than a lifetime. Less than a lifetime ago our black and brown parents and grandparents were treated like a lower form of animals AS A MATTER OF OFFICIAL POLICY.

At least now we can resist such dehumanisation. At least now we can resist – at the UN, the ICC, at the ACHR, at the polling booth, in court. Whether they listen to us or not we can resist LEGALLY. And we can call upon the state to uphold, protect and enforce our right to resistance.

Who told you it was supposed to be easy?

The struggle did not end on October 1, 1960 when the Union Jack came down for the last time.

The struggle did not end in 1999 when we finally held held elections. The struggle did not end in 2015 when the party in power handed over to the opposition. The struggle does not end and each generation must inherit its own struggle. There is no UHURU. Except in Death maybe.

Happiness isn’t a state. Happiness is a fleeting moment of content in between depressingly mundane daily struggles. Happiness is stumbling upon a rose in the midst of thorns. It is festivals and dances in between reaping and sowing – rituals to remind us what we struggle for and renew our spirit.

Success is winning those daily struggles. Don’t lose sight of the forest for the tree. Do something inspiring. Go find one of our brethren in uniform and take a selfie. Support the troops. Hold the government accountable.

Good leaders will understand the meaning of this.

I would like to wish all of you a reflective and inspiring Independence Day.

#TheGospelAccordingToLesley

 

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Buhari Admonishes The Judiciary on Their Role in Fight Against Corruption

July 19, 2016

Buhari called on the judiciary to support the fight against the war of corruption yesterday.

Everyone deserves the best defence possible. Even the corrupt. That is the basis of our entire legal system.  Entitled to a legal defence to all accusations. A defence lawyer would not be ethical to do otherwise. And that includes using legal delay tactics.

The judiciary nevertheless has very wide discretionary powers.

However I put the blame squarely on the prosecution, and they are supposed to be the presidents men. A good prosecutor should anticipate and compensate for these delay tactics but frequently deploy their own. It should also hold the judiciary accountable and appeal any decisions that they feel are improperly given.

Our prosecutors lack the modern efficient prosecutorial skills.

An example from my family law practice.

Our client was sued for a divorce. We saw a defect in the form of the petition and asked for the case to be dismissed via a motion. It took 5 adjournments and more than 6 months to get the judgment. The case was dismissed and the petitioner quickly filed a new case in the same court before we could.

On the day we file our response, the petitioner purports to withdraw the case file and file a new one with a motion for substituted service (which we had previously decided to ignore to proceed speedily with the case.) This took another 3 months to sort out. Then we find out he didn’t properly withdraw the first suit, so there are two suits outstanding. Its taking another 3 months.

I see the same kind of unpreparedness in criminal prosecutors. Me and my client just want to get on with it. Its been almost a year. We have not had a hearing on the substantive issue.

I always win my cases because I am over prepared. Never lost a case in Nigeria. When I filed a suit against Shell BP in 2001 the Senior Advocate of Nigeria SAN that came to defend them in the Federal High Court in Umuahia entered appearance without protest. The court workers hail me no be small. They said it had never before happened. Hopefully not so much now.

My rather unscientific assessment is many lawyers are too quick to file a suit without proper research and investigation, do not do enough pre-trial strategy development, and rely too much on rhetoric and connections in the judiciary. After all, they all get paid per appearance. And the overstretched judiciary plays along.

(In 2016 Nigerian judges still record entire trial proceedings in long hand.)

The solution?

  1. Training and capacity building. For the prosecutors and the judges. I wonder what they would say if we asked them the last time they went for training and how/if they apply those skills now.
  2. Upgrade and investment in judiciary infrastructure. This may also require legislation.

Supreme Court Uphold’s Women’s Inheritance Rights in Igbo Nigeria

April 25, 2016
The Supreme Court on Monday, April 14, voided the Igbo customary law, which denies daughters inheriting their fathers’ estate. The Supreme Court said it was discriminatory and in conflict with the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.
It is a verdict that would have far-reaching effects in addressing a dehumanising tradition, which can no longer be excused in a modern, democratic society such as ours. It is a practice that regarded women as lower than men.
The judgment was given in a family dispute between Gladys Ada Ukeje, who was disinherited from the estate of her deceased father, Lazarus Ogbonna Ukeje. She sued her step-mother, Mrs. Lois Chituru Ukeje and her son, Enyinnaya Lazarus Ukeje.
A Lagos High Court, the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court all reached the same decision. They confirmed that Gladys was qualified under the laws of Nigeria to inherit her father’s estate. The verdict should settle this matter forever in favour of all daughters in all corners of the country to claim their birthright, which they had been denied.
Justice Bode Rhodes-Vivour, who read the lead judgment stated, “No matter the circumstances of the birth of a female child, such a child is entitled to an inheritance from her late father’s estate. Consequently, the Igbo customary law, which disentitles a female child from partaking in the sharing of her deceased father’s estate, is a breach of Section 42(1) and (2) of the Constitution, a fundamental rights provision guaranteed to every Nigerian”.

Nyanya: Two Years Later. While We Talk About The Chibok Girls What Became Of The Survivors?

April 15, 2016

I’ve been looking for one mention of the tragedy ‪#‎Nyanya‬ on 14/4/2014

The National Mirror is the only Nigerian or foreign paper that carried a headline remembering the incident that happened exactly two years ago today. And just a couple of tweets.

On the other hand ‪#‎BringBackOurGirls‬ has received extensive coverage and extensive support.

In the aftermath of the Nyanya bombing hundreds of Nigerians donated time, money, food items and other forms of assistance to the injured.

I remember meeting a young Illorin lady in her 20’s with a baby on her at National Hospital. She was trying to get the body of her husband released so she could take him home for burial. He was a driver. I still wonder how she is coping with her two children.

i met so many hurt and traumatised Nigerians, male and female in the hospital beds. The mother of the only baby involved in the blast had shattered two legs. She called me about a year ago. She is healed and can walk now.

I keep in touch with some of them. I hired one of the survivors as my driver when her recovered.

Let us not forget those who lost their lives, those who lost their livelihoods and those that lost their quality of life on April 14, 2014.

I would like to thank Olufunke Baruwa, Zakari Momodu, Emeka Odita, George Blankson Theodora Eromobor Charles Chizor Onuba Uche Anyanwu Maya Edukere Opuama Pamela Baride Ayi Osori Obi Asika and a host of others that reached out to help us.

We started a Facebook group and registered with the local government so that we could help out more. Then as more Nigerians and institutions became involved and more attention was directed at the growing IDP problem we moved on with our lives.

Its kinda sad to see that no one remembered them today.

Zakari, Theodora – who has those phone numbers? Let’s call these people up and ask them how they’re doing.

Yohanna who I hired as a driver recently lost his job when my contract ended and needs a new one real fast. He has a young wife and a baby.

Who’s in?

P.S – Its good to know that the perpetrators are being prosecuted but its kinda frustrating to see that two years later they are still submitting evidence. This should have been a priority case if for no other reason to assure ALL Nigerians that bad behaviour WILL have consequences.

What can we do my legal luminaries?

Sexual Harassment in Nigeria’s Girls Secondary Schools

March 21, 2016

 

Let’s be real people, this has been a problem since 19kiridim. if we were to start a hash tag and tell all the stories of sexual harassment we experienced in school the archive might sink the world wide web.

I remember secondary school. I remember my final year Math teacher. Can’t remember his name but he was a lot like this Olaseni fellow. Smart but creepy. Always making inappropriate sexual comments about students. I was a particular target. I avoided him and his classes like the plague. Then there was the Chemistry teacher too. And the French teacher. The first french phrase he taught us was ‘Avec la langue je base’ which meant you use your tongue to kiss. French kiss I guess. I squirmed. Some of the students laughed.

I heard some of the students agreed to have sex with them. Then again this was all a long time ago, when a lot of female secondary school students were above the age of 16 or 18 and legally could consent. I heard they may have had sex with younger students too but they never really insisted. They created an atmosphere of hyper sexuality and sat back to wait for the ones that took their bait so there was never any real evidence and the students that did certainly didn’t want to say anything.

We didn’t have the tools or the language to report or confront them. Maybe some students felt they had to give in. Maybe some thought they could get better grades. Maybe some like me just avoided them (and flunked their classes). Did our principal know or suspect anything? She must have. She always seemed to know when nkpokopi was going on. She gave us a many an assembly lecture on the evils of nkpokopi or same sex relationships among students but we never were warned or armed to defend or resist or report the male teachers.

Did we think it was over when we left school? Did we really think so? Could we have been just a tiny bit in denial all these years? This is after all uber patriarchal Nigeria. Girls and young women are vulnerable, did we really think they would be safe in the care of male teachers?

There were of course the male teachers with integrity that never would even dream to take advantage of a student. There were very clear personality differences between the two types of male teachers – the predators were smooth. I can imagine them smooth talking the principal even and mine was an Iron Lady.

I’m really glad we are talking about these things. We need to set and enforce standards in our schools and we need to equip our girls with the tools to resist or mitigate the bullying that we all know goes on in schools in Nigeria. Time to get our heads out of the sand as enlightened mothers unafraid to talk about sex and do something.

I had sons and never really had to confront this issue. Our issues were different – cults, bullies and hazing being the top three. My sons did Taekwondo. It helped but the day I went to their school they kneel down beg me make I no come again because they expected a back lash for my presence. Rumors of rape of boys were less frequent though not unheard of. One reason why I never sent my sons to boarding school sha.

Of course this is not a ‘Nigerian’ problem, its a global problem. Its a global rape culture that is just a bit more pernicious and acceptable in some places than others. Remember the Saville scandal in the UK? And increasingly we are hearing of female teachers in some countries abusing male students. I wonder if any male student in Nigeria will ever complain if his female teacher took him and shagged his brains out. He would be a hero in the school sef.

Sexual assault and abuse of children, male and female – is a problem. We need to see the Queens’ College incident in a broader context and look for systemic solutions to a growing problem. Unless teachers know that they are being watched and they will be held accountable they will not have incentive to stop predatory sexual behaviour. And we need to let our children know that we will protect them, believe them and fight for them when their right to be children is infringed.

Living Under the Patriarchy: Burying A Husband

March 8, 2016

My best friends husband died recently. He was from Oginibo in Delta state, an Urhobo. She is from Eket in Akwa Ibom state, an Ibibio with a Russian mother. It is easier to get from one to the other by boat through the creeks. We had planned a regatta for her traditional wedding. I guess thats never going happen now.

He died. Just like that. He was 52. Kidney failure they said. Most of us didn’t even know he was sick. I haven’t seen my best friend in awhile. Life. You know how it is. I only heard he was in the hospital a week before he died. When I heard I felt a worm of fear. He wasn’t the type that went to the hospital. If he had a headache he took paracetamol. If it persisted more than a week he took something for malaria. He was a big hardy stoic kinda guy.

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Daniel Mowoe Opuama (17 September 1963 –  23 February  2016)

According to Urhobo tradition he had to be brought back to his ancestral village for burial even though he never lived there. Even though his wife and children had only visited the place once in the 16 years they were together. Even though he told his wife during one of those conversations he wanted to be buried wherever he lived. Even though she is the next -of-kin. Even though this is the 21st century.

So off on a 448km journey to Oginibo we went last Friday. Oginibo is 17 km SE of Warri somewhere in the Delta near the Forcados River. A google search isn’t very helpful. There are no population figures for the place and it isn’t actually named on google maps. One site said it has a ‘small population’. I came across a picture of their town square. Real native country.

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Oginibo Town Square (Source Oginibo Community Facebook Page)

When Delita, The Duchess, heard the burial was to be in Urhobo land and not in Abuja as previously proposed she went into a panic.

“Maya, I heard all sorts of horror stories. I heard they will lock you up in a room for 3 months and make you shave your hair!”

Many other friends warned that the natives would use the opportunity to milk the bereaved family. They told horror stories of their own. Stories of shake downs, blackmail and child napping. It cost a lot to bury a man. (Every where in Africa it costs less to bury a woman.) Apparently the Urhobo have a taste for expensive burials.

“They will ask you how your husband died.” Maya’s mother-in-law tried to reassure us. We didn’t know what to think but it seemed easier to let it go and bury him where ever his kinsmen wanted.

It was like planning a invasion. Money is tight so we decided we weren’t going to feed or water the natives. None of our business. We did some research on Urhobo and tribal jurisprudence. A ray of hope emerged – Maya and Dan never had a wedding under tribal laws! They got married in the registry. If the natives tried to impose any repugnant widowhood practices we would remind them of that.

While Maya’s kinsmen could not formally attend her brother would come to represent and protect her. Max our brother from another mother was also coming. A woman’s greatest protection in her husbands house is her own kinsmen. Thats why no one wants their daughter to marry far away. How else could they keep an eye on her and ensure her husband didn’t sell her into slavery or abuse her. Or something.

We also called in some favours with a brother in law for some heavy calvary. Just in case.

The drive down to Warri was pretty uneventful. We spent the night in Warri and ate bang soup for dinner. The Jubilee Conference Centre where we stayed was built two years ago. The Catholic Bishops of Nigeria decided they wanted to hold their conference in Warri but there was no hotel good enough for them so they just built their own.

The drive from Warri to Oginibo was like a time warp. The jungle just got thicker and thicker and the roads narrower and narrower with each kilometre. Our men were late joining us and we had to leave the morgue without them.

I called Max.

“Max, where are you? We’re on our way to Oginibo.”

“Still waiting for our car.”

“Max. You people can’t do this to us. You have left three women and two children to go into the jungle to face the natives. You guys need to catch up. NOW. please.” I sounded calmer than I felt.

“Where’s the calvary? Weren’t they supposed to meet us along the way? Where are we sef?” Maya asked.

Compulsively I reeled off the names of each community we passed – Ovwian, Ukpedi, Jeremi, Ayagha, Imode. And invoked all the deities I knew – OkwaraAgu, Ezenwanyi, Amadioha, Jesus, God. Angel Gabriel, and Michael.

We arrived Oginibo and the deceased’s homestead escorted and surrounded by natives speaking in Urhobo. Then they said we should come in for a family meeting. We sat down in the hall while the natives argued. Ever so often they gestured towards Maya. It was pretty obvious what they were arguing about. I chided myself. Why didn’t I think of bringing along an interpreter!

“Please we are educated.” one elderly woman said to the squabbling men in English.

“Hian.” I thought to myself.

Then the call came.

“Madam, this is Captain So So and So with the Nigerian Army. What is your location please?”

Our calvary had arrived! Within minutes three Hilux trucks arrived with over 30 soldiers and took up strategic positions around the compound. We sat in the hall, relieved but still pensive and waiting. Their arrival seemed to bring out a couple more natives who walked in authoritatively, greeted us ever so briefly and said something to the squabblers that seemed to escalate the discord briefly before walking out again. Later we learnt they came and stopped what was indeed an attempt to make Maya undergo some sort of trial by ordeal.

Then I looked up and there was Max and Yuri standing in the doorway! Our men had arrived. They must have broken all speed limits to get there so quick. Sometimes relief is spelled M-E-N. The mood changed. Drinks, kola and money were brought out and presented in welcome. Women do not deserve a formal welcome.

It was smooth sailing after that and the burial proceeded without further ado. No repugnant demands, no strange and demeaning widowhood practices. They invited us back to the homestead for entertainment but we declined. The Army escorted us all the way  back to Warri and we high tailed it to Benin City to spend the night before departing for Abuja the next morning.

Mission accomplished. Thank you father. We are grateful.

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Lip Service to the Rule of Law

February 6, 2016

 

Ever since Oscar did Riva chicks be sacred to go piss in the middle of the night. Now the Ibadan chick has done her husband and men be scared to sleep at night.

(Poetic justice? Karma? grin emoticon )

Shouldn’t couldn’t this case be an Oscar and OJ like epic MEDIA EVENT? Or at least a ‘Murderers in Our Midst’ kinda documentary? The chicks father is a judge. But dis na Naija, na Nollywood movie they go take am do add am some juju inside the plot for extra charm and drama.

The 5th Estate in Nigeria is become nothing more than a propaganda instrument. Where else in the world do you pay media from the security vote? And for what exactly?

Or a lynch mob passing emotionally charged judgements. Even Sahara Reporters won’t commit those kinda resources unless nah to expose gov’ment.

Investigative journalism has been suppressed by the elite that control the media and the mob is mesmerised by style with no substance. Critical thinking is discouraged.

Everyone’s scared. Rightly so maybe. This is cut throat business. Free enterprise without no rules. They WILL kill you and NOTHING will happen. There will be no consequences.

We all bayed at the moon like a pack of werewolves as the story broke but who’s going to go every hearing and diligently follow up on Yewande’s prosecution AND publish it?

The only way to end corruption and impunity is by shining a light on the dark places where it flourishes. We have to bring things out into the open to ensure they are done fairly.

Then again in the grand scheme of things, competing priorities and opportunity costs is the Yewande Fatoki murder the most important thing to commit scarce resources to?

Well think about it – dem talk say if you can’t be diligent in small things you cannot be diligent in big things. If we can’t transparently and professionally investigate and prosecute a Yewande how we gonna prosecute a Dasuki?

We won’t. They both going to play out in the media, sentences will be handed down and appealed, what we think of the judicial process and the judiciary will depend on our party allegiance, not justice or fairness.

Institutions have no morality. It is the people in the institutions that are corrupt, not just the providers but also the consumers. We are ALL participants in corruption so long as we engage with these institutions. We are FORCED to participate in the system.

“Go to court” the rich and well heeled mock the not so rich and 8 degrees removed.

I have clients who ask me “So when are we going to ‘see’ the judge?”

I’m sure they will be the ones shouting “Off with his head” the loudest when judge is arrested.

We do not have the capacity to prosecute these cases. We need support and mentoring from those who have done it successfully before us.

The bullshit Mugabe & Co be propagating that “we gone do it our way” is just a whole lot of bullshit if ‘our way’ still hasn’t produced positive results more than 50 years after Independence.

And while I’m up here and thinking about our E-Lite rulers – could the government of Buhari please stop releasing vague statements through obscure online media about monies being returned and do a proper accounting for us the citizens of this country and owners of that money?

Tell us how much? Tell us who? What account was it paid into? How is it captured? And how will it be appropriated? Please.

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